Image of Paul Cao

Paul Y. Cao
Associate Professor

Patternson 205
Voice: 419-289-5960
pcao@ashland.edu
Curriculum Vitae

   
B.S. Nanjing University of Science & Technology, 2001
M.S. Duke University, 2003
Ph.D. Duke University, 2006
 
Schedule for Spring Semester 2014

CS 122 -- Computer Programming II
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:00 - 11:50 in Kettering 229
LAB Tuesday, 10:50 - 11:40 in Kettering 229

CS 301 -- Computer Architecture
Tuesday, Thursday 12:15-1:30 in Patterson 301

CS 303 -- Algorithms
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 2:00 - 2:50 in Patterson 301

CS 260 -- Linux OS and Scripting
Monday 3:00 - 3:50 p.m. in Patterson 303

Office Hours:

MWF 9:30-10:30, TTH 2:30-4:00, or by appointment

My research interest is System Biology (It took quite some time to find what I really like to do). System Biologists try to decipher the complex relationships among a large number of biological components. Contrary to the "reductionist" approach, system biology focuses on the study of a biological system in an integral manner. Unfortunately, existing engineering/mathematics tools are not suitable to give us an understandable picture of the biological system which is highly uncertain yet being very robust. So new mathematics/statistics tools must be invented to simultaneously model hierarchy, uncertainty and complexity. To me, the lack of competent mathematical models is the bottle neck in the development of the system biology.

Some interesting papers on system biology
1. Hood, L., Systems biology: integrating technology, biology, and computation. Mechanisms of Ageing and Development, 2003. 124(1): p. 9-16.
2. Kitano, H., Systems biology: A brief overview. Science, 2002. 295(5560): p. 1662-1664.
3. Kitano, H., Biological robustness. Nat Rev Genet, 2004. 5(11): p. 826-837.
4. Lazebnik, Y., Can a Biologist Fix a Radio, Cancer Cell, 2002. 2(3):p. 179-182.

My research is focused on the inference of genetic pathways from microarray and sequence data. I am also working on a new system biology model, CMAP, which uses linguistic variables to model the interactions among biological, chemical, or mechanical entities.

See my publication list and professional activities here

Coming Soon!